A free Japanese class in Okinawa


Hi everyone! 

Check out this Blog post about improving your life and integration into the community though learning the language! It’s so vital to be a part of what’s going on around you through learning Japanese when living in Japan. 

A night at a resort for 50 bucks…


Okinawa is the Hawaii of Japan. I love living here and one of the winters I was able to hang out at a super fancy hotel for only 50$. I was so stoked. My friend found a deal for the Okuma Beach Resort hotel online. I wrote about this cool hotel stay in my Okuma Resort Review on Taiken. Check it out if you like.

Okinawan Folklore | The Ryukyu Kingdom’s kings…

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Hi guys,

have you heard of the ancient folklores revolving around the Ryukyu kings of Okinawa? Here is an article I wrote, about the ancient stories revolving around the Goddess that came down to Ryukyu and was forced to marry…

It’s  on Taiken.co, a Japanese/English travelblog. Check it out.

 

Kaldi’s Coffee *Mild Kaldi* Roast

   
 I’m back with the posts! I hope you guys are doing well and you got a good start into 2016! 

Let me introduce you to my new coffee blend: Mild Kaldi from the import store Kaldi’s Coffee Farm. If you live in Japan, like Coffee or crave the goods from your home country, this store is probably one of you favorites. I bought coffee there the other day for first time. They were serving this blend (Mild Kaldi) at the entrance of the store. I liked it so I went ahead and got a 200g bag. It cost about 450¥. I make Hario pour overs with it and add milk and caramel syrup. Yummy! 

The biggest lunch 

Look at my friend’s incredible lunch set at a Shokudo (食堂). It cost 650¥ and filled him right up. Soba as a side, fried pork (Katsu), Egg, rice, beef. It looks so delicious!   
   

My first Persimmon ever

To be honest: I thought this was an orange tomatoe when I saw it at the vegetable stand. My friends told me, it’s a Kaki (Japanese for Persimmon). I found it for 90¥ at the store today and bought it. It was sweet and almost a bit overwhelming. I couldn’t finish it. But I liked it. It reminded me of a sweet melon.

  
    
 

The last piece in Japan

  
Just to let you know: this is not staged! Japanese really always do leave leftovers. Often just the last piece, out of politeness to others. Everyone thinks: Someone else might want it. 

Yes, that’s basically the reason why you always have 1 or 2 pieces leftovers for every dish you served at a potluck or party. 

I love my Japan! 

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